Page 7 - LINKING VERBS IN ENGLISH AND TURKISH - YUKSEL GOKNEL
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LINKING VERBS IN ENGLISH AND TURKISH

            Besides  the  vowel  harmony  rules  above,  there  are  three  more  essential
            vowel rules to consider:

            1. The verbs ending with vowels drop these vowels when they attach to
            the allomorphs of [İYOR]. These vowels are double underlined. Besides the
            double underlined vowels, there are some consonants that are single un-
            derlined which show that they detach from their syllables and attach to the
            first vowels of the following allomorphs to produce new syllables. In Turkish,
            morphemic sequences, which are loaded with meaning, are transformed into
            different  syllables  and  phonemes  by  the  Turkish  sound  system  to  be
            produced  by  the  speech  organs  easily  and  harmoniously.  In  the  following
            examples, the morphemic sequences of some verbal phrases are given first,
            and then their forms are separated into syllables by asterisks given between
            parentheses:

            Bekle-iyor → (bek*li*yor);  başla-ıyor  → (baş*lı*yor);  anla-ıyor → (an*lı*yor);

            gizle-iyor  →  (giz*li*yor);  oku-uyor →  (o*ku*yor);   atla-ıyor →  (at*lı*yor)
            ye-iyor  →  (yi*yor);  gözle-üyor  →  (göz*lü*yor); gizle-iyor  →  (giz*li*yor)

            Gel-iyor-um → (ge*li*yo*rum);  yüz-üyor-uz  → (yü*zü*yo*ruz);  iç-er-im →
            (i*çe*rim); yaz-acak-ım → (ya*za*ca*ğım); yakalan-acak-ız →  (ya*ka*la*-

            na*ca*ğız);  gül-er-im → (gü*le*rim);  kork-ar-ız → (kor*ka*rız)
             2. When the last syllables of the nouns (including the infinitives), the verbs,
            and the inflectional morphemes end with vowels, and the first vowels of the
            following allomorphs start with the same vowels, these two vowels combine
            and  verbalize  as  single  vowels.  For  example,  when  the  last  vowel  of  the
            word  “anne”  and  the  first  vowel  of  the  allomorph  “em”  happen  to  be
            articulated together, they combine and verbalize as a single vowel: “anne-
            em” → (an*nem). For instance:

            anne-en    (an*nen);    tarla-am    (tar*lam);    araba-anız    (a*ra*ba*nız);
            kafa-an  (ka*fan); git-ti-in  (git*tin); bekle-di-ik   (bek*le*dik);  gül-dü-
            ük    (gül*dük);  yakala-dı-ım    (ya*ka*la*dım);    git-me-em    (git*mem);
            çalış-ma-am  (ça*lış*mam);  temizle-en-mek  (te*miz*len*mek);  Dinle-er
            mi-sin?  (din*ler / mi*sin);  ol-sa-am  (ol*sam), bil-se-em (bil*sem)

            If the last vowel of a word and the first vowel of an allomorph happen to be
            different, these two vowels are generally linked by the /y/ glides:
            oku-ma-/y/ız      (o*ku*ma*yız);    gel-me-/y/iz    (gel*me*yiz);    tava-/y/ı  →
            (ta*va*yı), salata-/y/ı (sa*la*ta*yı), uyku-/y/a → (uy*ku*ya).



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