Page 6 - LINKING VERBS IN ENGLISH AND TURKISH - YUKSEL GOKNEL
P. 6

LINKING VERBS IN ENGLISH AND TURKISH

            As one could see, the two diagrams above look exactly like one another. All
            the  words  in  the  Turkish  language  follow  either  the  first  or  the  second
            harmony  sequences.  The  words  borrowed  from  other  languages  do  not
            follow  these  sequences  as  expected,  but  the  suffixes  that  attach  to  them
            follow the vowels of the last syllables of such words. Consequently, one
            could build up meaningless vowel chains made up of only vowels following
            the two vowel chains:

            “o*u*u*a*ı*a*ı”,   “o*a*ı*a”,   “ü*ü*e*e*i”,   “ö*e*i*e”,  "ö*ü*ü*ü",  "o*a"
            For instance:

            “kom*şu*ya” (o*u*a); “kom*şu*lar*dan” (o*u*a*a); “ge*le*cek*ler” (e*e*e*e);
            “o*luş*tur*duk*la*rı*mız*dan”  (o*u*u*u*a*ı*ı*a);  “u*nu*ta*lım”  (u*u*a*ı);
            “o*ku*la” (o*u*a); “ten*ce*re*ye” (e*e*e*e); “ka*ça*ma*ya*cak” (a*a*a*a*a)

            One  could  make  up  Turkish  meaningless  vowel  chains  as  many  as  one
            wishes using the vowel chains above. I advise those who are interested in
            learning  Turkish  to  make  up  meaningless  vowel  chains  like  the  chains
            above, and repeat them loudly again and again. When they do so, they can
            memorize the Turkish vowel harmony sequences easily and soundly as they
            learn  a  piece  of  music.  When  they  repeat  them,  they  may  even  feel  and
            sound as if they were speaking Turkish.

            As  it  has  already  been  stated,  borrowed  words  do  not  follow  the  vowel
            harmony sequences, but the last syllables of such words attach to suffixes
            in accordance with the vowel and consonant harmony rules:

            patates-ler-i   (pa*ta*tes*le*ri)  “the potatoes”;   televizyon-u
            (te*le*viz*yo*nu)  “the television”;   mandalina-/y/ı (man*da*li*
            na*yı) “the tangerine”;  sigara-/y/ı  (si*ga*ra*yı) “the cigarette”.

            The “s/, /ş/, /n/, /y/” consonants used above are glides (semivowels) inserted
            between  consonants  or  vowels  to  help  them  pass  the  voice  from  one
            consonant or vowel to the following ones smoothly and harmoniously. They
            do not carry meaning.


            One more thing to add to the explanation above is that the  words that are
            formed  of  two  separate  words  do  not  follow  the  above  vowel  harmony
            sequences. For instance:

            kahverengi    (kahve  +  rengi)  “brown”;  buzdolabı  (buz  +  dolabı)  “refri-
            gerator”;  bilgisayar (bilgi + sayar) “computer”;  tavanarası (tavan + arası)
            “attic”.



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